Enjoy Life More, Weigh Less, Get Happy

I was reminded of something I used to know, which I had forgotten. What I was reminded of is, “Put the Bags Down”. Many of us without realizing it do what is called stamp collecting. The stamps we collect are little slights, inconveniences, small problems we can not immediately solve such as frustrations, boredom, and other nitty irritants that get in the way of our otherwise perfect moment of our perfect day.

We wear over our clothes an old shirt. On that old shirt without being aware of it, we put little sticky notes of whatever little incidents occur in our day to remind ourselves, lest we forget, of how things are not going our way at the moment.

My biggest series of stamps are about back ache. My back went into spasms a few years ago. (I would not recommend back spasms as a good way to spend a month or six.) From time to time, my back feels worn out, on the verge of aching. I have without realizing been saving these sore back stamps over the last few years. Pulling them out when I felt the need to feel sorry for myself.

Last week, I was watching a short video about putting the bags down. ‘Bags’ being life’s little problems. I was guilty of wearing that old shirt with my collection of sticky notes of back aches interfering with my day. Also as my focus was being distorted, I would occasionally add another sticky note about something I found irritating in the moment as my back hurt.

Halfway through the video, I  decided to take off my old sticky note covered shirt, and place it in a bag and put it out in the trash bin. Holding on to past problems does not allow one live in the present moment. Old problems hinder and hamper the good of the moment as are when live in the present.

We have lived our past, and we are able to some extent shape our future. It is living in the moment which is most important. The present moment is where good and not so good things happen. By not living in the moment, and wearing our old shirt with the sticky notes on it, we miss the good things that are going on in our life, and instead look for reasons to add another note to our shirt.

Spend your time in the present moment, enjoying all the goodness that is present and around us. Bad things will happen of course. Bad things balance our life and help us see all the goodness we enjoy each day. Keeping track of problems and focusing on them makes us lose sight of the present and the good things that are happening in the moment.

So what things should be thrown away? The list is long, but it can be done throwing away a few items at a time. Hate, anger, jealousy, envy, are a few of the things you should not carry around with you.

Thoughts about your looks or personality can capture a lot of sticky notes. Who cares if you are fat, skinny, have a big nose, a poor smile, big hands, or small feet. These things make difference to how you experience happiness in your life. Is your birthday any less special because you are different? Does a sunny day, or good meal with friends or family taste any different?

Be happy in who you are and let go of the baggage you are carrying around about yourself. A swimming pool, lake or ocean does not care if you entered the water in a sweat suit or a string bikini. Just give it all up and start living your life for the good things in it. Anything in your life that is keeping you out of the moment is something you should put in the bag.

Sometimes these emotions find there way back. They sort of sneak back into your life when you are not paying attention. If this happens to you, just bag ‘em up again, and throw them away. After a few times they won’t be able to sneak back into your life.

Join me and remove that old shirt covered with sticky notes and old stamps which are records of your lives problems and frustrations. Place that old shirt in the trash. What is done is done.

Saving sour and sad reminders of our past to replay over and over, takes us to a place where we spend our time validating past issues and more importantly allowing them to manifest again in the present moment. Life is lived in the moment. Life is not much fun, when it passes you by because you are wallowing in the past.

 

Money For Nothing and Chicks For Free

Money for nothing and chicks for free – MTV Song, Dire Straits, 1985. I think this is fitting for the beginning this post. Maybe the ending too.

Cruising the Internet last week, I ended up looking at search hits about subliminal advertising, or subliminal messaging. The things you do when you are bored! There was so much nonsense and half truths. Maybe I am immune to them, and they do not effect me?

I started almost skimming the articles from links I clicked on. One link after another, with some amount of blah, blah and nothing to catch my focus. I had been skimming for too long, and it showed up in the last article I had time to read.

From previous articles, I learned that people respond better when they have responded before in a positive manner. For example, a homeless person walks up to you and asks you for the time. It seems outwardly an innocent request, but it is anything but.

The homeless person is changing your relationship with each other. By asking you the time, they become someone you are having a dialog with. They are asking you to do something for them, “Do you know what time it is?”, or something along those lines. Now you have an exchange of dialog, and you have a loose attachment.

Now the homeless person, being successful with the first request, goes on to their real point of the relationship encounter. They now either ask you something else that doesn’t matter, or they ask you for something, usually money.

Of course now that the homeless person is part of your circle of friends you are more likely to give them money, food, or otherwise fulfill the request. If you walk in the city, you have been well trained to respond to this situation.

This explains why children usually reserve what they really want when in a store for their third or fourth request. They know from previous times, their third or fourth request is more likely to be granted than their first few requests for some toy.

Then I found the article that surprised me. The article was about how our brains filter out information as we watch, listen, or read. Same as when we already know the story before the person talking finishes talking. We know what is going to be said, and simply fade the sound to white noise. I was already to this point, skimming and half reading, looking for the jewel in the ground, so to speak.

…you are in a conversation for someone, a person of the opposite sex, with whom you may want to pursue a romantic relationship with. I was skimming along having mostly ignored a few previous paragraphs as they did not seem important. There were some questions, where I totally missed the whole question. Even after prompting to read it again I misread the question, and had to compare the quoted question to the original.

You ask three or four simple questions that are always likely to be acted upon. Remember the Homeless Person? You ask other questions that are always likely to be answered with ‘yes’.

Do you think diet is important to a happy life? Me too, good food makes for a healthy body. Do you think exercise is important to a happy life? I do too. In fact I try and walk every day. Do you think sleep is important to a happy life? I know I feel better when I get enough sleep..

So you agree with me then that diet, exercise, and sleeping with me are important to living a happy life? If so, what are some of your favorite healthy foods? What do you do for exercise? How many hours a day do you sleep?

Listening to advertisement of products that are trying to break into their niche market operate in a different way. They use little three or four word phrases like, Feel better fast, Power you body, buy now, send money, easy payment, improve your mind.

I was so amused by this idea of being manipulated, I had this conversation with six people, three women and three men. One woman asked me to repeat what I said three times. The men for some reason listened better than the women.

Until last week, I thought I was aware of all these ad bombs, yet I thought I was immune. In general conversation, I now see how often they are being used, and perhaps we are not immune. We are always being training to respond to requests, whether in advertising, or person to person, or general commentary.

Erasing Risky

The second and last Cat, Risky died last week, heading towards his nineteenth birthday, which is quite long for a cat. I suppose this post is about erasing a long time pet and family member from your life. Risky was an odd cat, so maybe my erasing him seems a little odd in itself.

I knew when I came home Wednesday eveningt and found blood pools around the living room and hallway, Risky was running his last race. He had been throwing up for about five months, but nothing like this. Not this amount of blood. There was so much blood I thought it had to be half of what was in his body. It looked as if a knife fight had taken place in the living room.

I found him on the bed, his normal spot for that time of day. Laying there he looked normal, eyes clear, and indifferent in that cat sort of way. When he atood, I knew it was as serious as I was afraid it would be. Instead of standing, Risky shivered, tilted, and wobbled as he tried to stand up. By late Thursday evening he seemed to have quit drinking, and by Saturday morning I was on my way to the vet to make arrangements for him.

Risky didn’t come back home with me after his first car trip in almost fifteen years. The erasing process has started. One empty pet carrier and no Risky inside. I emptied Risky’s cat box as there was no need for it now. I put it in a plastic bag with the scoop, and put it in the garage. I swept up what clay litter pieces there were to sweep. I gave the floor a quick wipe.

I picked up Risky’s cat beds, three of them, where he slept in the daytime depending on the time of year, all three beds by windows. On my hands and knees, I scrubbed at the blood stains in the carpet for the second time. It made little difference, the blood stains are semi-permanent I think. I washed his food and water bowls. I could not put them away yet.

Sunday I worked. When I came home, I started collecting whatever cat toys were in sight. There were a couple dozen toys, hidden under the couch, in the corners, under things. He was given a lot of toys over his almost nine-teen years. I collected leftover cans of soft food and the partial bag of dry food. I bagged them to give them away on Monday to someone with a cat.

Tuesday, I collected the last of Risky’s toys as I vacuumed the carpet to clean it again, for the second and where the spots were, the third time.

Wednesday, I steam cleaned the carpet, picked up a few more toys that hidden away. I vacuumed the curtains to remove his hair from them. I need to do this a second time, just not right now. I washed and dried the throw Risky slept on when he was on the bed, and the blanket that was below it.

I cleaned out the freezer of a half dozen small baggies of hamburger meat, and “on special” trout fillets Risky doesn’t need any more. I threw out his cardboard scratchers. Every day I wonder, where he is, or what is he doing when I hear a noise, followed an instant later by remembering – Risky is dead.

As this happens I think about my two trips to the vet on Saturday. Standing outside the closed door each time, once by myself, and once with Risky in his pet carrier. How painful I found it to take two final steps, open the door, and take two more steps to the desk. It was even harder to talk.

I don’t know how long it will be before Risky is erased from the house. Every room, most of the furniture, and so many small noises, and lack of small noises have his memory in them.

I think this is a good thing. It reminds me I am alive, and I have feelings. It also reminds me I am mortal, someday it will be me, and this is how life works.

It has been two weeks now and company has arrived. It was a simple thing to tell them Risky died. I skipped the details. As the outside door opens and closes over the last few days, I keep thinking, Risky is going to get out. Then almost as quickly, I remember.

Bullett Proof Linux For Beginners

I read this in a couple of places today. Someone had a real flash of insight when they thought of it. Whoever it was, let me know so I can credit it to you. I read this several times, and the source was not identifiable.

If you want a bullet proof Linux installation of your very own, how do you do it? How can you have an installation of your favorite Linux distribution that never breaks because of something you tried to do? A rock solid Linux that always performs as well the day it performed when you first installed it?

I wish this was around when I started using Linux. I would be a Linux pro by now, or at least a pretty advanced user. Enough delay and buildup to a great idea.

When you first install your Linux Distribution of choice, and it is updated, and everything is working perfectly, add a virtual box to your system.

Once you have  a virtual box installed, install your Linux Distribution on Virtual Box. You do not have to update it if you do not want to, and I am sure your distribution would prefer you did not.

If you really need to update your virtual machine do a little bit more. It would be fair, since you are doubling the work of the distributions server, to donate some money to your distribution of choice.

After all, you would be on your way to becoming a Linux Pro, if it were not for them. Contact the site admin, or one of the forum moderators on how to donate. Most Linux Distributions are ran on a shoe string, and they would really appreciate your financial support.

Now when you want to make any changes to your system, make those changes in your virtual machine first. This way, if you make a mistake, you can undo it, or copy back your pristine virtual machine backup, and start over, knowing your working system is safe and secure.

This is an almost perfect setting for a learning environment too. You can tinker, modify, and change settings to see what effects what. If they are not good changes, you haven’t hurt your working Linux System. If they work as you hoped, and wow you, you can make the changes on your working Linux system.

You can even go further. On the forums of your Linux distribution of choice, there are always one or more post install problem sections, where forum members write about their Linux problem in the hope someone knows the fix and responds.

If you like to tinker, and want to learn more about Linux, you can do what they did, breaking your virtual machine. Then you can see if you can fix the problem in your virtual machine.

When you can learn to fix simple problems, you can post the fix, helping out another Linux user who is not as advanced as you are. Then you can start tackling harder problems and help me out :-).

Not only, will this help you learn Linux, but it will help you better understand how Linux works because you can get in their and play with the nuts and bolts of your system.

You may not want to update your virtual machine, as it is likely to break, and you don’t want to put undo download stress on the distribution server; sending files costs money.

You should learn how to copy your virtual machine file to a safe location. Make sure you shut it down first before copying your virtual machine file to another location.

This way when your virtual machine breaks, you have a good working copy of your virtual machine. Copy your virtual machine back from its stored location to your virtual machine folder.
I read this in a couple of places today. Someone had a real flash of insight when they thought of it. Whoever it was, let me know so I can credit it to you. I read this several times, and the source was not identifiable.

If you want a bullet proof Linux installation of your very own, how do you do it? How can you have an installation of your favorite Linux distribution that never breaks because of something you tried to do? A rock solid Linux that always performs as well the day it performed when you first installed it?

I wish this was around when I started using Linux. I would be a Linux pro by now, or at least a pretty advanced user. Enough delay and buildup to a great idea.

When you first install your Linux Distribution of choice, and it is updated, and everything is working perfectly, add a virtual box to your system.

Once you have  a virtual box installed, install your Linux Distribution on Virtual Box. You do not have to update it if you do not want to, and I am sure your distribution would prefer you did not.

If you really need to update your virtual machine do a little bit more. It would be fair, since you are doubling the work of the distributions server, to donate some money to your distribution of choice.

After all, you would be on your way to becoming a Linux Pro, if it were not for them. Contact the site admin, or one of the forum moderators on how to donate. Most Linux Distributions are ran on a shoe string, and they would really appreciate your financial support.

Now when you want to make any changes to your system, make those changes in your virtual machine first. This way, if you make a mistake, you can undo it, or copy back your pristine virtual machine backup, and start over, knowing your working system is safe and secure.

This is an almost perfect setting for a learning environment too. You can tinker, modify, and change settings to see what effects what. If they are not good changes, you haven’t hurt your working Linux System. If they work as you hoped, and wow you, you can make the changes on your working Linux system.

You can even go further. On the forums of your Linux distribution of choice, there are always one or more post install problem sections, where forum members write about their Linux problem in the hope someone knows the fix and responds.

If you like to tinker, and want to learn more about Linux, you can do what they did, breaking your virtual machine. Then you can see if you can fix the problem in your virtual machine.

When you can learn to fix simple problems, you can post the fix, helping out another Linux user who is not as advanced as you are. Then you can start tackling harder problems and help me out :-).

Not only, will this help you learn Linux, but it will help you better understand how Linux works because you can get in their and play with the nuts and bolts of your system.

You may not want to update your virtual machine, as it is likely to break, and you don’t want to put undo download stress on the distribution server; sending files costs money.

You should learn how to copy your virtual machine file to a safe location. Make sure you shut it down first before copying your virtual machine file to another location.

This way when your virtual machine breaks, you have a good working copy of your virtual machine. Copy your virtual machine back from its stored location to your virtual machine folder.

Linux Distro Hopping, a few Distro Comments

Since I have been checking out a number of new distros, I thought I would post a quick line or two on them. One of the important things for me, is a distro be able to see youtube and Ted videos out of the box, or easily make them play. I also use usenet, so a usenet reader is also on my list.

One finding, or food for thought: Using LVM means you have to backup anything you want from your home directory before installing another distro. If there is a workaround, I did not find it.

I think the simplest hard drive scheme is a 10 – 15  gig root (if you have the space), a swap file that matches your memory or at least four gigs for movies, and whatever space you have left as home – unless you multiboot.

Crunchbang #! (Debian) – see my previous post, is awesome once you understand it, and can get past “Windows way” thinking.

Kubuntu & Xubuntu (Ubuntu 14.04) – This is a very stable, easy to use distro, using the KDE desktop of course. I find myself doing too much clicking when going through the menu for a program, depending on where it is. Uses about 550 mb of ram.

* This applies to all ‘buntu from what I read…If you multiboot, grub occasionally misses all your distros. Also only Kubuntu, though it was installed on sdb, put grub on sda without asking.

Linux Mint (Ubuntu 14.04) – Awesome. A very well thought out distribution. Most of the programs are programs you want to use. The different desktops are for the cpu speed, amount of ram, and hard drive space, although, even if your system is new, you may notice a speed difference between the desktops.

LXLE (Ubuntu 14.04) – Not sure what to think about this one. Comprehensive is a good word for LXLE. It is fast, and very large at the same time. There are enough programs you may never need to add anything. Though I did not notice any that would not get used over time.

Debian 7.5 – Sparse and fast. Installs with the LXDE desktop, which is one of the fastest desktops around. One of the most stable and secure distributions around. Not pretty, you will need to add software, and you may want to tweak the settings. You do have the option of loading any other desktop, and window manager such as XFCE, KDE, or Gnome. I think if you give LXDE a chance, you will like it.

Plays youtube videos from basic install, at least the few I tried. Copy and paste the link below to load flash player so you can watch TED and maybe some other videos.

https://wiki.debian.org/FlashPlayer

A downside of Debian is Debian and Debian users are not overly friendly at times. They are usually experienced users, and have little patience for asked a 1000 times questions.

Kannotix (Debian) – This is a good solid distro. It’s been around a long time. Not a lot of flash, just solid.

SolydXK (Debian) – Close to Kubuntu and Xubuntu. SolydK did not like my Intel video chip set, and gave me a few problems. Solid though, and upgraded just fine. SolydX is awesome, but the upgrade left search the engines option out of Firefox.

Net Runner – Very fast! I liked this distro right away, until I looked for a binary news reader – like Pan. I could not find one. Other than that, it may need to be tweaked for appearance, but it is very fast.

Manjaro – Fast, but too green for me. I became annoyed by the color scheme too quickly. I am not a KDE expert, and playing around with the settings left me wanting someone who knows what they are doing to change the color scheme. Also had a few small problems. This distro may be troublesome for new Linux users. Updates pretty quickly too.

CrunchBang 11 “Waldorf”, my Thoughts Jun 2014

Sometimes less is more. Sometimes less frees you from doing more. Less makes you think about what you want to do rather than what you could do. Less is very effective at removing time wasters.

I tried Crunchbang Linux some years ago, when it was unstable, and prone to breaking. I did not enjoy the Crunchbang experience back then. Who wanted a Operating System that was going to break, had a silly menu, and an empty desktop?

I finally get it. I finally understand what Crunchbang delivers, and what it represents for me. After the install, there is a dark mostly empty screen, with Conky on the top right side. The menu is sparsely populated. Only the minimum programs are there. A perfect blank canvas waiting for paint.

What programs are present are all most of us use in our day to day computing. From here on out, once Crunchbang is installed, if you want more, you need to do it yourself. This is the real power of Linux and Crunchbang in particular. The basics are covered, the rest is up to you.

Out of this emptiness Crunchbang Linux sits in the revered top twenty on the Distrowatch web sites ranking of Linux Distro’s most popular. For a long time I did not understand why. I think I do now.

Does it matter I have fifty of the greatest Linux programs ever written a few mouse clicks away if I rarely use them? Does it matter that my desktop could be placed in an art gallery when my net-centric apps are covering the desktop?

When I installed Crunchbang a few days ago, it was obvious some changes were needed. I thought I fell of the deep end, again. Where was the bling, the color and cool desktop pics, etc? Where were the programs I use?  I did not like the dark desktop which is the default Crunchbang. What was the point of how the menu is accessed. Who cares about Shortcut Keys?

I brightened up the desktop. I added the programs I prefer to use. I added them to the menu. I modified the menu to a menu I like. I don’t know if I am done, but I know I can add, remove, and modify almost everything.

My old dislikes were: The menu sucks, the programs are old, the distro is dark and boring. Truth is, menu access is brilliant. One left click anywhere on the desktop and there is the menu.  The programs are rock solid, and in almost every case perform every function the newest release does. I changed the desktop wallpaper to something lighter. I added some programs I prefer to use.

Using Crunchbang is watching your favorite television show at prime time, without commercials. Crunchbang is surfing the net without any ads. Crunchbang is a word processor which loads full screen with only the cursor as a distraction.

Crunchbang is so popular imo, because it is malleable. Crunchbang is true Linux putty. Crunchbang allows you to have a desktop and programs you want, not what a majority of people are willing to live with. Crunchbang allows you to create the perfect Linux for you.  You do not need a dedicated team to set up your desktop, You can learn in mere minutes how to modify the desktop and the menu to your liking.

Linux is a series of trade offs. Everything is a trade for something else, with few exceptions.  Crunchbang is one of those exceptions. Crunchbang frees you from some of what you do not need, and allows you to take control of your Linux experience.

Crunchbang has great resources in their forum, and more distant help scattered across the web. Everything I wanted to change, I found posts in the forum. Almost everything in Crunchbang is changeable, and explained in a way everyone can understand. The forum feels homey, somewhere you can hang out with friends and talk Crunchbang, even distro hopping if you wish.

The web’s Crunchbang comments and articles are helpfull too, but may not apply to the current version. I prefer forums for distro support. Crunchbang has a very good forum. I enjoy the tone of the posts I read.

Crunchbang is very personable, once you realize Crunchbang prefers you make most of the decisions beyond the basics. Perhaps this is the crux of Linux in the separation between beginning Linus users and more skilled Linux users.

Beginning Linux users want the experience of Linux with no thinking, and that is good as Linux is a new experience. Perhaps more experienced users know the difference. Jump in with an open mind, willing to learn, and no preconceived notions of what a Linux Distribution should be, and give Crunchbang a go. You might like being in control of your computer and master of your Crunchbang Linux realm.

Easy Linux Distro Hopping – Thunderbird and Firefox

One of the good/bad things about Linux is distro hopping. Distro hopping means trying out different distributions of Linux as the mood hits, or an exciting new distribution appears. Some people change Linux distributions monthly. Other people less often. Some people not at all.

A few people have their favorite distribution and try out other Linux distributions on the side, so to speak. I am one of those people. For me the Linux distribution I am using is possibly not as great as the new distro I will take for a test drive. I do not want to miss out.

One of the downsides to jumping Linux distributions is email and web browser settings. Email because I either have to keep email on the server, or I have to ensure I do not need any emails in the old distribution before I delete it for the next latest and greatest Linux Distribution.

There is an easy fix however, if you use Mozilla products which I am a big fan of. I prefer Thunderbird for my email and Firefox as my web browser. If you are using either or both of these, distro jumping becomes much less painful.

This post is for the new distro hoppers. A How To for easily moving your Firefox and Thunderbird email, address book and settings to your newest distro. This works for popular distros as of June 2014.

With [most] Linux distros, all your files are kept in your home directory. Your email, and your browser settings are stored as invisible files in your home directory. This is how Linux keeps everything right in the case of multiple users on a computer.

Each user or account has their own home directory where their personal files are stored.  This makes distro jumping easy. When you want to either try out a Linux distribution or try out a second distribution, keeping your email and browser settings is a fairly simple process.

In your file manager, no matter which manager you have is a setting in preferences for viewing hidden files. This needs to be checked because you want to view hidden files – temporarily.

After setting the hidden files switch, when you look at you home directory, you will see a number of files that have a period in front of the folder name. These are hidden folders. Most folders contain settings and other information for the user based software you have installed.  There are a number of hidden folders, and they tend to clutter up the file manager, so they are hidden and not viewed by default.

Two of these hidden folders you are most interested in are: .mozilla and .thunderbird. These two folders contain all your Thunderbird and Firefox email and settings.

Your new distribution needs to have Thunderbird and Firefox installed. If they are not present, install them both before proceeding.  Copy these two folders, .mozilla and .thunderbird, from your old home folder to your new home folder. Your file manager will warn you that these folders exist and do you want to replace them. Choose: yes.

Tat is all there is to it. I did one jump recently where this did not work for Thunderbird, not sure why. What I did was create my accounts in Thunderbird, and then close Thunderbird before allowing to to check of new email. When I reopened Thunderbird, my old emails, address book, etc were all present.

Sports and Porn, Best Actor Awards?

As someone who is watches sports on a casual level, I am always surprised at the players. Whether I watch the FIFA games, NBA finals, or MLB, there is always a show being put on. I never envied the referees and umpires. Not that the referees and umpires are being over tasked, but there roles have expanded. I am surprised at the amount of acting going on at this level of sport.
Watching FIFA, I see the acting is on par with the NBA. Players falling over in a dramatic style, agony on their faces, grabbing body parts, or laying still waiting for the whistle. They make it look doubtful they will ever be able to stand up again, let alone play. If the whistle doesn’t come, they are up in a flash running down the field.

Watching an NBA game, I see two-hundred plus pound men in the key falling over when barely bumped, acting like a train hit them. The player being touched is falling over, not the player doing the bumping. Other times players find ways to get in the way and then bumped, hoping to cause a foul on the opposition.

Players in the MLB and college level baseball, have their non verbal body language, mainly pitchers and batters, are body language experts. Often they are telling each other off using their body language. Making both subtle and overt sexual and other references towards each other involving package checks, and occasionally, other more explicit body language.

I watched a college baseball game last week where the batter was grabbing and throwing his crotch towards the pitcher. The picture was busy going through his own repertoire of movement, creatively flipping the bird at the batter.

It has all become part of the game. Each player or team trying to get an edge on the other.  Hoping the referees and umpires will be unable to separate fact from fantasy. Some of these games have more drama in them than  soap operas.

Perhaps as a casual watcher of sports, I notice these behaviors as I do not watch enough sports to make more refined observations concerning the play. For me, watching the acting is entertainment enough.

Maybe it is time to start a sports actors guild? There could be a best actor and runner up in each sport or division. There could be an award for the best sequence of falls over the season, based on believability. The best faked trip, or foul. How about the most obscene gestures thrown in a season. Award winners would get a cash award on top of a trophy.

Where does this leave the Referees and Umpires? Maybe they could have slots on the award show for most correct calls, best at ignoring antics, and maybe even directing pitchers and batters to clean up their acts.

Sports and porn are the reason the Internet made it. At one time, sports and porn took up over fifty percent of all bandwidth. Casually watching sports these days, I wonder if porn is the cleaner of the two. Especially if you throw in excessive and continuous spitting in baseball.

The falling in sports, and porn are both fake, so maybe acting during the game awards and best acting porn awards could be the same show?

Make You Laugh

Laughing and happiness are two cornerstones to feeling good about you and your life. Money, power, and other trappings of what from the outside look like a good life are illusions. If you can’t laugh and you don’t feel good about yourself from the inside everything else doesn’t matter.

With that said here is a funny joke. Having spent a lot of time there, I can relate to it.

A man is sitting in a dentist chair. mouth open wide.

Dentist, “I am going to give you helium”

Patient, “Will it help the pain?”

Dentist, “No but it will sound hilarious  when you scream.”

I don’t know who made up the joke, but thank you!

Auto Immune, ADD, Pregnancy, and Acetaminophen Link Possible

Acetaminophen is a wonder drug. It is generally safe to use, when proper dosing is followed, works great for pain relief, and does not upset your stomach as some other pain relievers may. Acetaminophen also has a dark side. I have read up to an estimated 17,000 overdoses per year cause serious health concerns and/or deaths per year.

Recently two articles caught my eye about Acetaminophen. The first was about a link between Acetaminophen and Celiacs. Celiacs, loosely described is a wheat or wheat gluten allergy.

When I discovered I was a Celiac, it was barely being recognized as an actual illness. A few years ago, estimates were one in one hundred and forty people of European descent had some level of Celiacs. Today, I am hearing estimates of more than one in one hundred people may be effected by Celiacs and are not aware of it, because it hides so well in our body unless it becomes an extreme sensitivity.

Celiacs is commonly thought of an auto immune disorder these days. I have seen Celiacs grouped with Multiple Scleroses, Gout, Diabetes, and Crones disease. Whether these are all variations of one issue is a hot debate in medical and scientific circles. Whether they too may be affected by Acetaminophen, I have not read about it. Seems like a possibility though.

There appears, from what I read, to be two new side effects to Acetaminophen according to the articles. One is Acetaminophen makes one more sensitive to wheat Gluten (Celiacs).

The second more serious side effect may be a disturbing link between Acetaminophen and ADD, when the pregnant mother takes Acetaminophen during her pregnancy.

As someone who was taking Acetaminophen three or more days a week, stopping has strongly reduced my gluten sensitivity, and returned my life to almost normal. No longer do I need to be concerned about a lone crouton in my salad making me ill.

I no longer feel sick with Celiac symptoms when I know I have not had eaten any wheat in the last three or four days. Eating oatmeal which is one of my main breakfast foods has not bothered me since I stopped taking Acetaminophen.

I have been told Celiacs itself, “Is all in my head” by a few odd people. I have to disagree with them. Celiacs is all in my digestive track. My head only notices how poorly I am feel.

As to taking Acetaminophen while pregnant, I have no opinion. It is obvious, years ago ADD and illnesses like it were a rare occurrence, and is now a minor epidemic. The article I read claimed a link between Acetaminophen use during pregnancy and ADD symptoms as the babies develop.

I do not have any medical advice to offer one way or another on this. I do not know if what I read is based on real studies or repeatable data. What I do know is not taking any Acetaminophen products has made me feel better.

If you are Celiac or have another auto immune disorder, you can determine for yourself if Acetaminophen has any effect on your body. It was as obvious to me, as not eating wheat in any form first was. Within a couple of days I started feeling a lot better.

As to pregnancy and Acetaminophen, this is a decision each Woman should make of her own volition, independently of other opinions. In any case it is a matter of risk verses reward. In my case the risk seemed small until I started to enjoy the reward.