Everything You Need to Know About Your Dust Bunny Collection

List or numbers posts are getting silly. A blog post used to be an article about one general idea. Until some bright SEO driven marketer, wanting to drive more traffic to their site came up with topic titles using lists.

“How to improve your Dust Bunny Collection” would have been a popular post title in the past.

This type of post could be hashed and rehashed into several different follow-up posts, all focused on collection, care, and maintenance of Dust Bunny Collections.

MadBunnyAmbitious Bloggers or web site owners focused on marketing decided they needed to one up single topic posts. They started producing posts with thought provoking titles such as:

“Two ways to improve your Dust Bunny Collection”

Of course this was the beginning of the numbers trend in post titles for web content. Everyone was producing content with their post titles starting with numbers. One way to… Two slick ways to… Three unbelievable ways to…rehash Dust Bunny Collections.

Eventually numbers two and three in a post title became passé. Those sharp marketing guru’s out on the bleeding edge decided to up the ante:

“Five great ways to improve your Dust Bunny Collection” became the new norm. If you couldn’t come up with at least five creative ways to improve someones Dust Bunny Collection, you were behind the power curve in the SEO marketing world. It was probably time to throw your keyboard away.

If you have a garden variety reading interest like I do, you may notice that five ways is being supplanted by six or seven ways. Those marketers out on the leading edge of going one better seem to have skipped a few numbers.

The newest numbers trend I am reading on the web these days is:

“Ten ways to improve your Dust Bunny Collection”

Soon ten ways will not be enough. Maybe a dozen or more ways to improve your Dust Bunny Collection is more fitting? Create e-books maybe? I can hardly wait.

Has content fallen to quantity? Content no longer seems as important as quantity. Content is stolen, filtered and reposted almost as fast as it appears.

It is all about the numbers now, both post titles and web traffic. You the reader are ebing cheated. What happens if I am curious about one specific item about my Dust Bunny collection? What if I want to know whether I should spray each of my precious bunnies with hair spray to help them last longer?

Do I need to read repetitive clone posts containing a dozen or more ways to maintain my Dust Bunny Collection when I want advice on one specific item? How did we ever manage before marketing and post titles by the numbers became so popular?

There are times where a number of points are better to cover a topic, or make a point. These times are limited however. Do I really wish to read 11 points I already know about looking for one great insight to put my Dust Bunny Collection over the top? Why waste my time in this manner, reading  watered content. I bet you do not want to waste your time reading rehash either.

I find myself skipping articles I may be interested in when the title starts off with numbers. I would rather read a post about what I want to know rather than waste my time on an article I have to wade through looking for something, which may not even be there.

Shame on me for wasting your time. Excessive reading about Dust Bunny Collections, and what did you learn? I suppose this post is really lacking in quality, though it is filled to the brim with quantity.

Homeless and Invisible, Mexican and successful

In the 1980’s when Ronald Reagan was president, America felt about the same way it feels now. America was looking for a hero, a financial fix, and a sense of self worth.

Earning a living was a hard, pretty much like people are trying to make ends meet today. Feels like Ground Hog Day lately. In an effort to reduce taxes, someone decided that institutionalizing people who were not a threat to themselves or others was a violation of their civil rights.

In a short period of time the walls of sanitariums fell, and tens of thousands of people were free to live a life that was their ‘legal right’, or in other words, literally kicked to the curb to fend for themselves. Nobody really noticed what was happening except their taxes went down. This homeless group of people were pretty much invisible, migrating to inner cities where few saw them on the streets.

During this same period Caesar Chavez prevailed in nothing short of a revolution for Migrant Farm Workers. Migrant Farm Workers were Mexican citizens who did low pay long hour ‘agricultural’ jobs, aka picking fruits, vegetables, citrus and such.

More and more Mexican citizens decided to stay and try to make this country their home. Speaking poor English, no real rights, and no financial support, they thrived.  They too were not noticed at first. There were few of them, and they lived quietly in rural and eventually inner city areas eking out what passed for a living.

It is interesting how some things have changed and other things have not. Mexican Migrant Workers have joined the American workforce with some becoming American citizens. Some small percentage have become wealthy, experiencing first hand the American Dream.

The homeless are still homeless. As natural born citizens many Homeless people lack basic skills which would enable them to hold any kind of job, have a place to call home, and a support network to help them. Many Homeless people who are mentally ill, or otherwise challenged and are brushed under the rug, as they fall through the cracks of life. They are rarely mentioned, barely noticed.

The Homeless population may be indicative of how we choose to treat those less fortunate than ourselves. People who legally may not be a threat to themselves or others, but emotionally or cognitively are not able to manage the basics of a normal life.

Homeless People wander and live in the streets, preyed upon, locked up, and murdered. This happens every day in our streets. We more fortunate Americans are unaware, or pretend not to notice. After all we can’t afford to help them.

I am in awe of the power of marketing. This is mass marketing in its finest hour. Mexican immigrants are the new pioneers, demanding their fair share from their newly conquered lands. The Homeless remain all but invisible. They are not able to get their act together, protest, and be heard.

Yet, the Mexican/American population of these United States shows the American Dream is still alive, and thriving. How is it a people who weren’t born here, may not speak any English, have several roadblocks in their path, become successful Americans, while the Homeless are ignored.