Kitchen Compost Scrap Storage and Preparation

This is part two of Pot Composting Made Simpler and Easier. I explain how to do  small pot composting with a few improvements..

Here is the first modification I made for small Pot Composting to work for me. I collect all compostable kitchen scraps into a small bowl beside the sink. At the end of each day I move them to a crock pot insert in the garage.

Compost Storage

Collection Point for Home Composting

This crock pot insert is a temporary storage until I have enough kitchen waste to make a green layer in the pot. Keeping it separate form the composting pot itself keeps flies and other insects out of the compost batch.

When I have enough green kitchen scraps collected, as I do in the picture, instead of putting it all directly into the pot, I first chop it up. The bottom picture is what I use to make the pieces smaller. One is a type of masher I found at a thrift store for $2.00. It works very well at making bigger pieces smaller.

The second item I use for chopping is a well used pair of kitchen scissors. I simply put them in the crock pot blades down and start snipping. This to is a very good method and fairly fast. It is cleaner than the masher as there are only the two blades to clean pieces of green waste from.

Mash and cut

Tools used to reduce kitchen scraps for compost

I find that pieces between 1/4 ” to 1/2″ work well and are decomposing quickly. I thought about using a blender as that would really chop the kitchen waste up. The downside to a blender is the water used in processing.

I have used green smoothie liquid in the past on my indoor plants with mixed results. Some plants thrive on the liquid and some plants are not in the least happy with it. If you wish to try using a blender, and watering with the juice, start cautiously.

About the crock pot inserts. I found four in two different thrift stores. They ranged in price from $4.00 to almost $10.00. Of course the crock pots with a removable insert cost a little more. They both will work.

Crock pots with non-removable inserts can be taken apart by loosening the nut on the bottom of the crock pot. This is a one way trip for the crock pot. When the middle nut is removed, there is one long copper wire wrapped around the pot providing resistance to to liner’s removal. The liner should come out with a firm pull. Unwind all the wire, and the pot is ready to be used. Be forewarned, they are not pretty to look at, but the inside is what is important.

If keeping kitchen scraps in a container is something you would rather not do, try this. Use a plastic bag or plastic container to hold your scraps. Keep the bag or container in the freezer. Everything stays fresh until you are ready to chop it up. Some thawing time will be needed before you start however.

Keeping kitchen scraps in the freezer is how I started. I found it a chore to open the freezer, take out the bag, open it, put the scraps in, close the bag, and put it back in the freezer. When summer is in full swing, I may be back to freezing myself.

Next article will be about how to put everything together in the pot for composting.