MX Linux, Patito fio is a Great Linux Distribution

My new Dell Computer with Windows 10 installed is quite picky about its neighbors. I would say it downright doesn’t like any neighbors. When I first bought this computer, the only Linux Distribution that would run on it was Ubuntu or an Ubuntu flavor. In my case Xubuntu.

Ubuntu is a great distribution, but it and the flavors are so well made, they fall into the category of well, boring. Except for the desktop choice, which adds its own flavor.

I bought my current Dell desktop in November. I have used Windows less than a few hours total in all that time. I decided it’s my computer and I want it my way. My Windows 10, no longer has a vote in who its neighbors are.

I also found a home for my old desktop. It is going to someone who rarely uses a computer. If you have ever filled the role of family admin, you know what that means. Every other day there is a new and exciting Windows error, problem, or virus. If left to their own devices, the user/owner has the computer all but bricked in a month.

As long as I was changing my choice of Linux distribution, I decided I would find one that makes me happy and meets the need of a new user. That distribution turns out to be MX Linux, Patito fio.

Great everyday Linux Distribution for any level user.

 

I only added a few programs (obviously Plank is one) and added the Home and Trashcan icons to the desktop. Those programs I don’t use, I can remove from the menu with the included menu editor. How slick is that?

But wait, it gets better. I was going through my pile of USB sticks looking for a few to donate with my old computer. I found four that were no recognized by Linux, my Mac, or Windows. I remember suddenly having flaky USB sticks some time ago. I think it had something to do with Windows, but who knows.

I was about to throw them away, when I came across a blip about saving seemingly broken USB sticks using, Live USB Maker. I had not looked at the program. and assumed it made a live USB out of the running MX Linux system. The blip caught my attention because it mentioned repairing broken USB sticks.

I ran the program, popped a broken USB stick in, and there it was, listed and waiting for me! I chose to format it. Live USB Maker works like a dream. Even one USB stick that was divided in two formatted back to one complete USB stick.

For the person getting my old PC, they will have a solid platform on which to learn the joys of addictive computing, excessive browsing, and playing a few games well into the night, without a crashing operating system.

That is as long as they remember if they click on a program in the menu, and they are asked for the ‘root’ password, they are starting down a slippery slope. Even then, if they manage to really hurt MX 19 Linux, and I can not fix it, I can use that slick little, ‘Live USB Maker‘ program and have them computing again in no time.

Needless to say, I am very happy with MX 19 Linux overall. Unlike Xubuntu which I was using, MX Linux has glitched a few times while using Thunar File Manager. I am not sure where the problem lies, and may be operator induced. Time will tell. Nothing serious happens, Thunar suddenly closes up. When reopened everything is as I left it.

I am sure, the MX Linux group would like you to take their new pride and joy for a spin. If you download it and try it out, leave a comment about your impressions. Also sharing is nice, as once you install it, you can tell your friends about your experience and lend them your ISO copy. If you think it’s the best thing since ice cream, you may wish to throw a few dollars their way.

Makulu Linux, Linux You May Enjoy Using

Makulu Linux, pronounced “Macooloo”, has been around a few years now and has remained mostly off the Linux Radar screen. Last week, Jack M. Germain writing for Linux Insider, published a post stating he thinks Makulu Linux is finally ready for prime time.

I downloaded Makulu Linux to see if it is true or only more noise. Makulu Linux in the past has never been a conformist or a MeToo Linux distribution. This newest release, LinDoz, the first of three to be released is no different. Makulu Linux is as far as I am aware, mostly unique in the Linux world.

Before going too far down the road, I will mention an issue in Live mode, I would lose the mouse. I have an old corded Kensington Trackball which may be partly responsible. Unusual for a smaller distribution, Makulu Linux has very good documentation and includes a FAQ accessible from the screen and menu.

I found the lost mouse fix so quickly, Losing the mouse, however did not carry over through to the hard drive install. I think this may be due to the faster load time, and my willingness to wait a few seconds longer.

Makulu Linux when installed to the hard drive really shines! I am glad I went beyond the live edition and completed a full install. Makulu Linux comes with it’s own desktop, two different repositories to customize your system from, and a refreshingly different way of looking at how a Linux Distribution should look and perform.

I am quite happy with the default desktop, but Makulu Linux has options for changing desktops. Upon boot, when you log in, you have the choice of desktops, Cinnamon, Cinnamon (software rendering), and XSession. I am using the default, Xsession, which works fine for me.

A new gem in the Linux World

Makulu Linux gives you a choice of using either Debian or Mint repositories. This is also a first as far as I know. Having choices of repositories without causing system crashing is unusual at best, and insane at worst. In my [short] time with Makulu Linux, everything is working as it should.

Makulu Linux install procedure, like the rest of Makulu’s philosophy is a little different, but nothing anyone who has done a few Linux Distro installs, or can think what a question means, can’t manage. A few places ask you to make a decision, though there are defaults if you do not have a preference, or do not know what to choose. In my case chose to install Makulu Linux alongside another Distro.

I was asked about repositories, and a few more normal install questions. One of the interesting features, is you have options for the base system you want Makulu Linux to be. Choices include Gaming, Business, or Home. I installed Home, so I have no comment on what the specific differences are.

It is refreshing that Makulu Linux, at least the LinDoz edition doesn’t overwhelm you with every piece of software under the sun. The only maybe extra software I found, is two editors, though they perform on different levels, so they are not two of the same in a technical sense. I have only added only one application to the base system. That is a text editor with spell check. My fingers never remember where the keys are, so spell check is a must have for me.

With the home edition, an up to date Libre Office is present to handle office tasks. Accessories is loaded with programs most people will use without being bloated. Everything most people use for the Internet is also present. There are three games installed. Administration is a pleasant surprise with options for drivers, and other apps to make Makulu Linux look and work as you want it to.

Compared to some Distro’s, the software selection may be thought to be sparse, but the developers feel a smaller install is better than than starting with a bloated system. I tend to agree. In closing, there are two more versions of Makulu Linux in the works. I’m excited to try at least one of them, though I am very impressed so far with the LinDoz edition.

A real eye opener for me is Makulu Linux choice of web browser. Makulu Linux uses Opera. Makulu Linux with Opera does web browsing a better experience! Makulu Linux Team has set up Opera to make the web experience even better than mainstream Firefox with a few add-ons is. Even more of the annoyance of browsing is gone using Makulu Linux’s Opera browser setup.

Of course, you may find a different result depending on your browsing habits. I am very impressed with Opera now, as I would not normally have given Opera a spin. On the downside, Opera feels just a tad slower, but I think it’s well worth the trade-off for the end result. And the perceived speed loss may be my imagination.

I recently went through a round of Distro testing, and Makulu Linux is best of breed among the distributions I tested. A few Distro’s were practically clones of each other. One Distro had these sudden annoyances that would come and go for no rhyme or reason. A few Distro’s fell short in what they offered, or perhaps what I wanted. Makulu Linux however was a fluke, and not one of the initial round of distributions I tested. I am glad I came across the link to the Linux Insider review.

If you read any of my older Linux Distro reviews, you will know I do not get to far into the details of install and operation. In general Linux is Linux, and if you can install one, you can install another. This post on Makulu Linux is no different in that sense. However Makulu Linux is a serious contender to replace my over time favorite. I wish to mention in closing, I really enjoy the quotes and the rotating wallpapers in Makalu Linux desktop, though I am sure some will prefer to turn them off.

— Quick update, Makulu Flash Linux has been released. Flash uses XFCE, and is impressive in its own right. Word of caution though, Flash is lacking a full office suite and a few other programs you may like to have. If you have lots of time for downloading, or fast bandwidth, you may wish to give Flash a go.