Adding Choice to Linux Color Schemes

Choice is what Linux is supposed to be about. You may do things your way. You may add this, or take that away. You have your choice of desktops, You can make your Linux bloated, or you can make it lean and mean. Some important choice is missing in many Linux Distributions.

Unless you are new to Linux, there is a commonality among most major Linux Distributions. Let’s see how much Distro hopping you have done while using Linux, and after we are done I think you will agree with me, Linux has a huge Achilles Heel.

Desktops are plain vanilla across most Linux Distributions whether you use Cinnamon, Fluxbox, flwm, FVWM, GNOME, i3, IceWM, ion, JWM, KDE, LXDE, LXQt, MATE, Openbox, WMaker, Xfce, they mostly look the same with exception of color from major Distribution to major Distribution. Snooze.

Want to try a short Linux theme color quiz?  Good. Here we go.

1. Which Linux Distributions use a blue theme?

2. Which Linux Distributions use a green theme?

3. Which Linux Distributions use a brown theme?

4. Which Linux Distributions use a black theme?

5. Which Linux Distributions let you easily make changes to your desktop colors?

6.Which Linux Distributions have Icons of more than one color?

When is the last time you looked at your Desktop and thought, ‘Wow, I like this’?

Imagine going to purchase a kitchen appliance. There are five brand names that all have similar appliances. How about buying an automobile. Every base model is more or less the same as another brand’s base model, Imagine a world, if no matter what you wanted to buy from underwear to Automobiles, every company had their own pet color? And buying from Ajax Appliance means your new appliance has a blue stripe around the top surface?

I think you get the idea. Here we are with Linux, where we can have it our way, as long as we want one set color theme. Of course, there are downloads and various options to change your desktop, sharpen it up, or make it look different, and possibly, unique.

Unfortunately the newer Linux user is busy learning Linux basics. They may not know or know how to add desktop effects, or make what should be simple changes. If your Linux Distribution has a blue theme, is there any real reason, why you have to continue to look at a blue themed desktop if you want to change the color? What if you really dislike blue, or brown, or green, or red, or black.Ditto for other main Linux Distribution colors.

Linux in general is becoming plain vanilla, most of the larger distributions only have color themes to differentiate themselves from other large plain vanilla distributions. The days, of really having any real differences in implementation or speed of your favorite desktop are gone.

If your favorite Linux distribution uses one of these desktop environments (DE). More likely than not the DE is no faster on your Linux Distribution than it is on most other Linux Distributions. With the exception of perhaps Mint Linux, which makes all DE’s conform to the Mint Linux idea of the perfect DE, they all look more or less the same in one Linux Distribution as in another.

What got me thinking about this is I am back to playing with Makulu Linux. I find Makulu Linux a breath of frsh color in a color challenged Linux world. If you want to read a well written review of Makulu Linux, you can find it here:

MakuluLinux Flash 2020 Could Be an Xfce Desktop Game-Changer

Makulu Linux, daring to be different

Makulu Linux reminds me of what Linux used to be. Makulu uses color, color, and more color. Whether Makulu Linux is faster, slower, or just as fast as the Linux Distribution you are using right now, is a moot point. Makulu Linux developers are not afraid to be different,

I have a computer with a graphics card capable of displaying more than 16 colors, I don’t need all my icons to look the same as the other 50 plus icons. I like color, and I enjoy the creativity Makulu Linux takes in their product.

Color! Who would have thought!

If you are not afraid of diverging from the main five or six colors of the main Linux Distributions, Makulu Linux and other smaller distributions are game changers. With that being said, not all smaller Linux Distributions use or access repositories of tens of thousands of programs and files, twenty-nine plus thousand of which you will never use.

This is the third iteration of Makulu Linux in the last few years, and perhaps they did not get popular enough for further development, but Makulu Linux seems intent on not being another plain vanilla Linux.

Maybe the days of having Linux your way are gone by the wayside. At least you do not have to put up with being bored into mortification from four or five color choices differentiating your Linux Distribution from another Linux Distribution,

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