How much is a Vacuum Cleaner Worth?

A few weeks after I wrote about my vacuum cleaner losing suction and how I fixed it, my vacuum cleaner bit the dust. The manufacturer was not to be cheated out of the expected life span of their product. The vacuum’s time to be replaced had come.

Plastic being plastic, one crucial piece of the vacuum cleaner suffered the same stress most hard plastic suffers. A plastic piece snapped off, rendering the vacuum useless for anything except when using the wand. Not very practical….

After doing some research, it became obvious there were only two real choices, irrespective of brands. The first option was to buy an expensive replacement. The second option was to buy the cheapest acceptable vacuum cleaner I could find, and most people liked.

Buying a reasonably expensive vacuum cleaner had many pluses. It would clean well. It would work as expected. It would not break or wear out quickly. Finally, I would feel I made a good purchase. These are powerful pluses for something that rarely gets a thought after it is purchased, unless it is being used.

Of course, buying a reasonably expensive vacuum cleaner means tying up a lot of money into something that in this reality at least, brings little satisfaction. Vacuum cleaners are not like prized, high dollar Cars that are washed, waxed and shown off. Vacuums get taken out of storage, used and put away until the next time.

On the other hand, a well rated vacuum cleaner could be had for about one-fifth the price of the more expensive vacuum cleaner. Just like the more expensive vacuum cleaner models, people were happy with how it cleaned, how it held up, and generally how it functioned. What more is needed?

Here is where the economy of money comes in to play. In my experience, no matter how much I had paid for a vacuum cleaner in the past, they would last between five and six years before starting to break. If they didn’t outright break, they started doing their job in a less than stellar fashion. Sort of like my old vacuum losing vacuum.

When this five year fall apart stage happens, there are really only two options. Either purchase over priced replacement parts which fix one thing, but do not prevent other parts from breaking, or go shopping for a new expensive purchase that really doesn’t add to the initial value. An old vacuum is in essence an old vacuum. No one brags about a vacuum cleaner in general conversation.

How much really needs to be spent on one?

If I were to buy a cheap acceptable vacuum cleaner there was another set of possibilities. I would pay about one-fifth the price. At this price, I could buy five vacuums in five or six years, and still be below the price range of a more expensive vacuum cleaner.

I would feel better about spending less than $100.00 for a vacuum that is only thought about when it’s taken out to be used. Once again vacuum cleaners are not conversation makers or breakers.

The money I would save was worth more to me than having a more expensive vacuum. For the $400.00 or more price difference, I would have that extra money to spend somewhere else immediately and that feels better. If, or when the cheap vacuum breaks, replacing it with another cheap vacuum isn’t a deal breaker. I would not lose sleep over the cost of replacement.

I bought the cheaper vacuum. I am guessing, I will get at least two years out of it, before it needs replacing. In that time line, I will be $200.00 – $300.00 ahead dollar wise. The only downsides are I do not see it advertised with angelic voices humming, and the wand flex tube is a little shorter. For the price difference, I can live with those minor problems.

Not everything is this cut and dried when it comes to spending money. Sometimes spending more money initially brings more long term satisfaction. I think a good way to look at how much needs to be spent on a product is how it impacts my life. It is more important my vehicle is operating, then the carpet goes two extra days without being vacuumed.