Debian 10 Buster, Perhaps Your Grandfathers Distro

I have been using Debian for the most part of my twenty years of my using Linux. Debian was always difficult, stodgy, and unfriendly to new users. Nothing has changed, and it feels like I stepped into a time machine, and went back in time with Debian 10 Buster.

Not new user friendly, barely user friendly

I downloaded, installed and used Debian 10 Buster for a short time. Debian Buster, is not targeted for a general audience.

I attempted four installs. Each install was a little different from the previous. The fourth install wanted a proprietary driver for my unused LAN. The second and third installations, for whatever reason would not install Grub correctly. Each of the four installations consisted of superfluous questions, a few different on each install, which should be handled by the installer.

Installation is unbelievably SLOW. For a release that is a few days old, downloading and installing an extra 1220 plus packages for the default is crazy! I could have installed Xubuntu three or four times in the time it took Debian Buster to complete one successful install.

This may have been negated if I had used the DVD version, but if that is the case, why have a CD version? Long time Debian users will say, “Wait a month or two and then install”. Debian is not a cutting edge product and is well tested before final release. This was good advice in the 1990’s, but not in 2019 for a major Linux player.

Debian Buster has bad manners when it comes to disk management. I installed on a 1 gig hard drive split in two with only the first half the drive formatted. Buster agreed to use only the formatted half of the hard drive, but insisted on formatting the second half too!

After a long dreary process, Buster is installed. But we’re not done yet. We are told to remove the installation media, before rebooting. It is not clear wether the installation media is still being used or not at this point. Two of the installs, I removed the usb stick, and perhaps this is the reason for Grub failure.

Debian Buster is pretty sparse. To add insult to injury some of my favorite programs were not only not installed, but not available in the repositories. I find this surprising because they are in Debian 9 repositories. Did I mention, no email program installed?

From my reading, it seems Debian Buster is using AppArmor to Sandbox Firefox. Needless to say, this doesn’t improve the speed department. While some may feel AppArmor or another application like it is a requirement, I am not one of them. My computing time is very web-centric and happens on trusted web sites. AppArmor should be my decision, not the software’s.

In ending what is several paragraphs of negativity, Debian once again has created a release with as little appeal as possible for the general user. If you are not general desktop user, and require only mainstream popular programs, with little browser use, Debian Buster is just what you may want to use. As I read over at Distrowatch some years ago, Debian is not a good Debian Distro (probably paraphrased),

Get Rid of Ants Outside Your Home Safely

Unless you want your yard turned into a hazardous waste site, your choices for getting rid of Ants completely is quite limited.

If you dig Ants up and throw the dirt somewhere else, they build their nest in the new spot. If you stir the dirt up and leave it in place, they frantically work to rebuild their nest. If you spray the nest with insecticide, within three days (or less), a new hatch happens, and the Ants go about their business as if nothing happened. Here are two safe options to get rid of pesky Ants forever.

The most difficult but cheapest way to rid yourself of Ants is as follows: Dig them up and place the dirt in a large bucket(s). Once done, fill the bucket(s) with water over the level of the dirt. Stir the dirt and add water as needed.

Ant’s are programmed to dig downward, and are rarely able to climb up a buckets sides. Ants will climb onto grass blades and twigs. If there are any grass blades or twigs in the bucket, remove them. As water covers the dirt, Ants drown. Hours later or the next day pour the mud back where the hill is. This will help kill any remaining Ants and Ant Eggs that were missed.

Cheapest way to get rid of Ants is to dig them up.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You may have to repeat this cycle a few times to kill all the Ants. Caution – If you let the bucket sit for a longer period of time, it smells pretty bad. Raw Sewage and other unidentifiable stink comes to mind.

A second safe and easy method is to buy powdered, “Roach Killer”, or “Twenty Mule Team Borax” from the laundry soap aisle. They both are made of Borax. Borax is a mineral with sharp points. Borax gets in the Ants joints and punctures the shell. The Ants then dehydrate. Sprinkle the powder on and around the holes of the Ant hill, and keep the area dry.

Borax when placed in contact with water dissolves and is harmless to Ants. This is why you want to keep the Ant Hill dry.

By the next day, all or most of the Ants should be gone. Repeat every two days as there will be Ant eggs hatching and restarting the colony. After about ten days of powdering the Ant Hill, all Ants should be gone.